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Wormwood 200-300 mg., 90 Capsules

 
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Hulda Clark's statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. Products sold on our website are not FDA approved, and they are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Those seeking treatment for a specific disease should consult a qualified physician prior to using dietary supplements.

 

Wormwood (artemisia absinthium), an herb known to improve digestion, is recommended by Dr. Clark as part of her Parasites Cleanse program. It has been traditionally used to fight worm infestations, to stimulate menstruation, and to treat liver and gallbladder problems.

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For more information on Dr. Hulda Clark's Parasites Cleanse Protocol, see The Parasites Cleanse Protocol.

 

Product Warning: Do not use if pregnant or nursing. Do not use longer than 4 weeks. This plant is poisonous if used in large quantities.

 

Ingredients: Wormwood (artemisia absinthium)

 

Packaging: 90 capsules, 250 mg.

Kosher & Halal certified, preservative & additive free, vegetarian capsules

 

Dosage: 1-3 capsules daily

 

For dosage and instructions for Dr. Hulda Clark's Parasites Cleanse Protocol, see The Parasites Cleanse Protocol.

 

Quantity Needed: Varies

 

Additional Information:

 

Medicinal Uses1

  • Anthelmintic =Vermifuge = expelling or destroying parasitic worms especially of the intestine
  • Antiseptic = preventing or arresting the growth of microorganisms
  • Antispasmodic= capable of preventing or relieving spasms or convulsions
  • Carminative = expelling gas from the alimentary canal so as to relieve colic or griping
  • Cholagogue = Promoting the discharge of bile from the liver and gallbladder
  • Emmenagogue = agent that induces or hastens menstrual flow
  • Febrifuge = agent that reduces fever; an antipyretic
  • Hypnotic = Inducing or tending to induce sleep
  • Stimulant = An agent, especially a chemical agent, that temporarily arouses or accelerates physiological or organic activity
  • Stomachic = Beneficial to or stimulating digestion in the stomach
  • Tonic = An invigorating, refreshing, or restorative agent
  • Vermifuge = Anthelmintic

 

Historical or traditional use (may or may not be supported by scientific studies): Wormwood is perhaps best known because of the use of its oil to prepare certain alcoholic beverages, most notably vermouth and absinthe.

As a traditional medicine, wormwood was used by herbalists as a bitter to improve digestion, to fight worm infestations, and to stimulate menstruation.2 It was also regarded as a useful remedy for liver and gallbladder problems.

Active constituents: Wormwood oil contains the toxins thujone and isothujone. Very little of this oil is present in ordinary wormwood teas or tinctures.3 Also existent in the plant are strong bitter agents known as absinthin and anabsinthin. These stimulate digestive and gallbladder function.4 Modern herbal medicine rarely uses wormwood alone. It is typically combined with herbs such as peppermint or caraway to treat heartburn and even irritable bowel syndrome. Clinical trials are lacking to support the use of wormwood for any indication, however.

How much is usually taken? A wormwood tea can be made by adding 1/2 to 1 teaspoon (2.5 to 5 grams) of the herb to 1 cup (250 ml) of boiling water, then steeping for ten to fifteen minutes.5 Many doctors recommend drinking three cups (750 ml) each day. Tincture, 10–20 drops in water, can be taken ten to fifteen minutes before each meal.6 Either preparation should not be used consecutively for more than four weeks.7

Are there any side effects or interactions? Longer-term use (over four weeks) or intake of amounts higher than those recommended can cause nausea, vomiting, insomnia, restlessness, vertigo, tremors, and seizures.8

Short-term use (two to four weeks) of a wormwood tea or tincture has not resulted in any reports of significant side effects.9

One study found there were no side effects when using less than 1 ml tincture three times per day for as long as nine months to promote digestive function.10 Nevertheless, consult with a healthcare professional knowledgeable in herbal medicine before taking wormwood. Wormwood is not recommended during pregnancy and breast-feeding.11

At the time of writing, there were no well-known drug interactions with wormwood.

 

References:

1 Leung AY, Foster S. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Food, Drugs, and Cosmetics, 2d ed. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1996, 1–3.

2 Leung AY, Foster S. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Food, Drugs, and Cosmetics, 2d ed. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1996, 1–3.

3 Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Gothenburg, Sweden: Ab Arcanum, 1988, 79–81.

4 Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. (eds). The Complete Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Boston, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 232–3.

5 Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Gothenburg, Sweden: Ab Arcanum, 1988, 79–81.

6 Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Gothenburg, Sweden: Ab Arcanum, 1988, 79–81.

7 McGuffin M, Hobbs C, Upton R, Goldberg A. American Herbal Products Association’s Botanical Safety Handbook. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1997, 15.

8 Leung AY, Foster S. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Food, Drugs, and Cosmetics, 2d ed. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1996, 1–3.

9 McGuffin M, Hobbs C, Upton R, Goldberg A. American Herbal Products Association’s Botanical Safety Handbook. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1997, 15.

10 Yarnell E, Heron S. Retrospective analysis of the safety of bitter herbs with an emphasis on Artemisia absinthium L (wormwood). J Naturopathic Med 1999;9:in press.

11 McGuffin M, Hobbs C, Upton R, Goldberg A. American Herbal Products Association’s Botanical Safety Handbook. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1997, 15.

 

Wormwood is a very bitter plant with a long history of use as a medicinal herb. It is valued especially for its tonic effect on the liver, gallbladder and digestive system, and for its vermicidal activity[4, 238, 254]. It is an extremely useful medicine for those with weak and underactive digestion. It increases stomach acid and bile production, improving digestion and the absorption of nutrients[254]. It also eases wind and bloating and, if taken regularly, helps the body return to full vitality after a prolonged illness[254].

The leaves and flowering shoots are anthelmintic, antiinflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitumor, carminative, cholagogue, emmenagogue, febrifuge, hypnotic, stimulant, stomachic, tonic and vermifuge[4, 9, 21, 46, 165, 222, 254]. The plant is harvested as it is coming into flower and then dried for later use[4]. Use with caution[21], the plant should be taken internally in small doses for short-term treatment only, preferably under the supervision of a qualified practitioner[238].

The extremely bitter leaves are chewed to stimulate the appetite[222]. The bitter taste on the tongue sets off a reflex action, stimulating stomach and other digestive secretions[254]. The leaves have been used with some success in the treatment of anorexia nervosa[244].

The plant is applied externally to bruises and bites[238]. A warm compress has been used to ease sprains and strained muscles[257].

A homeopathic remedy is made from the leaves[9]. It is used to stimulate bile and gastric juice production and to treat disorders of the liver and gall bladder[9].

As its name implies, wormwood has been used to expel worms from people and animals. Whatever antiparasitic properties wormwood has may be partially due to its alpha-santonin content (Perez-Souto et al 1992), which is recognized as a medicine for parasitic diseases.

Wormwood contains unidentified >>antimalarial substance(s). Alcoholic extracts of the dried leaves have 'considerable antimalarial potential' when administered orally, subcutaneously, or intraperitoneally to mice (Zafar, Hamdard, & Hameed 1990).

Wormwood leaves are used traditionally in Pakistan as an antipyretic (anti-fever) and an active antipyretic compound has been isolated from the dried leaves. This compound alleviates yeast-induced pyrexia in rabbits (Ikramet al 1987).

Dilute (1:1000) oil of wormwood has some antimicrobial activity. Kaul, Nigam and Dhar (1976) found that the dilute oil inhibited the growth of 4 (out of 7) different types of bacteria.

Wormwood is also hepatoprotective (liver protecting). Gilani and Janbaz (1995) found that an aqueous-methanolic extract of Artemisia absinthium protected against acetaminophen and CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. This protection seems to be at least partially due to inhibition of microsomal drug metabolizing enzymes (MDME), since the plant extract prolonged the sleep-inducing effects of pentobarbital in mice. Gilani and Janbaz speculate that this putative MDME inhibition may be due to sesartemin, which has the methylene-dioxybenzene group common to MDME inhibitors. The presence of antioxidants and calcium-channel blockers in wormwood (Gilani 1994) also probably contribute to its hepatoprotective effects.

Known Hazards: The plant is poisonous if used in large quantities. The plant contains thujone. In small quantities this acts as a brain stimulant but is toxic in excess.

For more information on Dr. Hulda Clark's cleansing protocols, get Free Dr. Hulda Clark EBooks and Cleansing Directions.

 

 
 
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